What is "The Court?", an Executor Asks?

I was talking to a colleague recently. He is the executor of his father's probate/Succession. His father had died years ago and there was still an account in the father's name that needed to be accessed and distributed to the children.

So the executor took it upon himself to gather up some paperwork (a copy of the Will and a death certificate), and he trucked on down to the place that had his father's account.

As I knew he would, he quickly ran into a dead end. He was told, "In order to access these funds, we need legal documents certified by the court within the last 90 days." 

He got frustrated because he did not know what "the court" meant. Should he go to the Supreme Court, should he go to the Clerk of Court? Should he just walk into a courthouse downtown? He was given no direction as to where or what "the court" was.

He spend two long days going to 12 different offices before he finally got what he needed. He was told that he needed certified "Letters Testamentary." But that was the wrong instructions. Letters Testamentary pretty much went away 15 years ago. Really what he needed were copies of the "Letters of Independent Executorship," certified by the parish clerk of court within the previous 90 days. 

The Louisiana Succession procedure is typically frustrating to the lay person, particularly when they try to do things themselves or even when they try to make sense of the archaic and inefficient probate rules.