Community Spouse's Maintenance Needs Allowance

Medicaid Income Rules When You Have a Community Spouse and an Institutionalized Spouse

Any way you look at it, long term care services are expensive. And when you have a married couple with one spouse residing in the nursing home while the other spouse is healthy enough to reside in their residence, it gets tough because on top of the several thousand dollar nursing home bill, the couple is also spending thousands monthly to maintain the residence. In these circumstances, couples spend hundreds of thousands of dollars over several years.

Many couples, particularly those who do not plan ahead, are forced to consume their assets (also called "Countable Resources"). This post is not about spending or protecting the assets, but this post is about how the monthly income of the couple gets handled.

Here's an example. Let's say that each spouse is receiving $2,000 of monthly income (social security and pensions are common forms of monthly income, but there are others).

Louisiana Long Term Care Medicaid rules provide that ownership of income is determined without regard to community property laws. For Medicaid purposes, a spouse has full ownership of income paid in his name.

In determining how much of the income the couple can keep. Medicaid rules provide that the income of the community spouse is never to be considered in determining eligibility for an institutionalized spouse. Keep in mind that the spouse residing in the nursing home institution is called the "institutionalized spouse," while the spouse still living in the community is called the "community spouse." The community spouse always gets to keep all of the community spouse's income.

In order to determine the institutionalized spouse's patient liability, we must start with that spouse's gross monthly income ($2,000 in our example) and subtract their personal needs allowance ($38). Then, we subtract the Community Spouse's Maintenance Needs Allowance.

The Community Spouse's Maintenance Needs Allowance is calculated by subtracting the community spouse's income ($2,000) from the Community Spouse's Maintenance Needs Standard ($3,160.50 for the first half of 2019 - it gets adjusted twice each year). Thus the Community Spouse's Maintenance Needs Allowance totals $1,160.50.

So, $2,000 minus $38 minus $1,160.50 equals $801.50. This is the institutionalized spouse's patient liability. The concept here is that the community spouse always gets to keep all of the community spouse's income. But if the community spouse's income is less than the applicable Maintenance Needs Standard, then the community spouse gets to keep enough of the institutionalized spouse's income to get the community spouse up to a total of monthly income that equals the Maintenance Needs Standard.

Keep in mind here that these are Louisiana rules and your state's rules may differ. Also note that this calculation is not made, nor is it relevant, if the patient is denied Medicaid due to too many countable resources or for some other disqualifying reason.

This post is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal advice. Please do not act or refrain from acting based on anything you read on this site. Using this site or communicating with Rabalais Estate Planning, LLC, through this site does not form an attorney/client relationship.

Paul Rabalais

Louisiana Estate Planning Attorney

www.RabalaisEstatePlanning.com

Phone: (225) 329-2450