Lafayette estate planning attorney

How to Keep Your Farm or "Family Property" in the Family for Future Generations

Many parents who have both children and grandchildren want to keep some of the property that they own so that their kids and grandkids can enjoy the property for many years to come. Perhaps the parents have seen how much their kids and grandkids enjoy the property.

However, when parents pass away and their property is left to children, property rules apply that may conflict with what the parents are trying to accomplish. Customizing the right legal program can ensure that one rogue descendant, or perhaps even the spouse of one child or grandchild, will not be able to mess up or destroy the family property that you'd want them all to enjoy.

First, let's look at some of the Louisiana laws that apply when multiple owners own real estate in Louisiana. Louisiana has a rule that states that no owner can be compelled to own property with another. When children inherit their parents' land, the children are considered "owners in indivision."

Anyone who owns an undivided interest in real estate in Louisiana, regardless of how big or small their ownership interest, can sell their ownership interest, or can force a "partition" of the property. The two kinds of partition are "partition in kind" and "partition by licitation."

When a piece of property is susceptible to being divided into lots, an owner can force a partition in kind whereby each owner would wind up with their own tract. Or, particularly if property is not susceptible to division into lots, an owner in indivision can force a sale of the property and the proceeds would be distributed to the co-owners in proportion to their ownership interest in the property.

Due to these rights that co-owners have, family property often gets sold eliminating future descedants from being able to enjoy the property.

Some owners of property think that by forming a limited liability company (LLC), the owners can keep the property in the family for generations. While owners of property should consider forming an LLC, and transferring their property to it, this is more of a "protection from lawsuits" vehicle than a "keep it in the family for generations" vehicle. Placing the property in an LLC and leaving membership interests in the LLC to your descendants won't prevent an owner/member from (1) selling or disposing of their LLC interest; (2) a member's creditor seizing their interest; or (3) giving or bequeathing their LLC membership interest to a non-family member.

These conversations about keeping property in the family for generations often turn toward creating a family trust. Parents would name a trustee or co-trustees (perhaps the "responsible" descendant") who will manage the trust assets for the benefit of all of the children and grandchildren. Backup trustees would need to be provided for since this trust may be in existence for many decades. Thanks to trust law, the descendants (trust beneficiaries) would not be permitted to sell, alienate, or mortgage, their interest in the trust, and the creditors of a beneficiary could not seize their interest in the trust.

Other issues to consider before pulling the trigger on something like this include the gift and estate tax, future Medicaid qualification, leaving funds to the trust to provide for ongoing management and expenses, and perhaps having the parents transfer the property (or their LLC which owns the property) to a revocable trust now (which trust would become irrevocable when the parents die) in order to avoid having the property go through a court-supervised probate proceeding when they pass away.

Every set of family circumstances is unique. You likely only have one "shot" to get it right. And the decisions that you make (or don't make) will affect your descendants for many, many years to come.

This post is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal advice. Please do not act or refrain from acting based on anything you read on this site. Using this site or communicating with Rabalais Estate Planning, LLC, through this site does not form an attorney/client relationship.

Paul Rabalais

Louisiana Estate Planning Attorney

www.RabalaisEstatePlanning.com

Phone: (225) 329-2450

Living Trusts and Income Tax

As we discuss an estate planning program with our clients, some of our clients that they would like to arrange their estate to avoid the court-supervised probate estate administration at their death, but they are concerned about how setting up a Revocable Living Trust might affect their income tax situation during their lifetime.

When you create a Revocable Living Trust, you will be what's referred to as the "Grantor" or "Settlor." You can amend or revoke the trust at anytime, and you are entiled to receive all of the income that the trust assets produce during your lifetime.

While there are many different types of trusts, this type is arranged so that you are still taxed on all income earned by the trust assets. You continue to use your Social Security Number on all trust bank and investment accounts. The trust does not need its own Tax Identification Number. As long as you live, all of the income is reported on your own personal income tax return, so you won't need to file a separate trust tax return.

Some people like that their trust does not complicate or change their tax status, but the assets in the trust will avoid the Louisiana court-supervised probate estate administration upon their death.

www.RabalaisEstatePlanning.com

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How To Structure Bank Accounts To Avoid Probate

One thing that frustrates families when they attempt to settle an estate is when they find out that any and all bank accounts that the deceased had are frozen by the financial institution, regardless of the amount of the accounts. Meanwhile, funerals and other expenses need to be paid.

People try every trick in book to outsmart the banks and the courts from freezing the accounts. The following are the top three ways people in Louisiana keep their bank accounts from being frozen at death.

(1) Add a Signer. Many "Do-It-Yourselfers" go to the bank and, perhaps, add an adult child or two as an authorized signer on their bank accounts. This often works, however, there is at least one major bank in Louisiana who will freeze the account at death even if there are other authorized signers on the account during the life of the account owner. So, check not only with your estate attorney but check with your bank.

(2) Payable on Death. Some Louisiana banks permit bank account owners to complete paperwork so that they make their accounts "Payable on "Death" (or, POD) to another person or people. This doesn't give anyone access to your account while you are alive, and the Designees must produce your death certificate to access the funds, but at least they will be able to receive the funds without having to go through a Louisiana Succession. Warning: Louisiana law does not entitle the designees to own the funds, POD simply releases the banks from liability for releasing the funds to the designees. If your estate planning legal documents differ from your POD designation, conflict may occur. And not all banks offer a POD designation.

(3) Trust Accounts. If you have a Living Trust, you can make your bank accounts trust accounts. When you die or become incapable, your Successor Trustee will have access to the accounts. Accounts won't be frozen. In the typical scenario, when you die, your Successor Trustee produces the trust instrument to the bank for approval, and then the Successor Trustee gains access to all trust bank accounts, and then disburses the accounts immediately to the trust beneficiaries without probate cost and delay.

Handling your bank accounts with an eye on estate planning can be tricky. It's a process that we go through with each client. But it's worth it when you arrange things so that your family has ease and simplicity instead of delay and frustration.

Paul Rabalais
Phone: 866-491-3884
Offices: All over South Louisiana
website: www.RabalaisEstatePlanning.com

Lafayette,Louisiana Family Benefits From Dad's Estate and Medicaid Planning

I've been working with a Lafayette area family lately. Dad has his home, his life savings, and a couple of other pieces of property, and he wants to make sure his kids get it when he dies. His biggest threats to his children, as he sees it, are:

  1. Losing the assets due to a long-term care nursing home stay;
  2. Taxes; and
  3. Probate

A large part of his life savings is tucked away in his Individual Retirement Account (IRA). He also has investments held in an account that is not an IRA, and he has some money in bank accounts.

He realized that his IRA is threatened. He knows that any distributions from the IRA during his lifetime or after he dies will be subject to income tax to the recipient of the distribution. He was questioning whether taking required minimum distributions each year was the smartest way to handle his IRA. Here's what he said:

"If I just keep taking my required distributions, then I will pay tax on those distributions and the remainder of my IRA will continue to grow tax-deferred. All of the future growth will be ordinary income to whoever receives a distribution and those distributions in the future could be taxes at a rate as high as 40%, particularly if they go to my kids. Plus, if I go to a nursing home, I will be forced to take large distributions, pay the income tax, and then spend the remaining amounts on my nursing home expenses."

Then he asked:

"Wouldn't it be better if I took larger distributions that the required distributions, pay the tax, and then place the after-tax proceeds in a special trust account where it will be protected from my future nursing home expenses? Oh, and since the trust is a Grantor Trust, any future appreciation of my investments after I take it out of the IRA will passtax-free to my kids due to the step-up in basis that they will enjoy when they sell the assets after my death?"

His analyses appears to make a lot of sense. Most people are encouraged to keep every penny that they can inside their IRA. I'm not saying that's wrong every time, but as long as the investments grow inside the IRA, then a big chunk of each distribution will go the IRS. If the IRA goes ahead and takes distributions faster than required, and pays the tax on those distributions, then future appreciation would escape taxation due to the step-up in basis. Plus, if the IRA owner takes distributions and places those funds into the right kind of trust, then there is the added benefit of being protected from future nursing home costs.

Anyone who has an IRA and is concerned about future taxes and about losing the IRA to nursing home expenses, should have a conversation with an estate planning attorney who understands not only the estate tax, but the income tax and capital gains tax consequences of taking minimum distributions versus taking distributions larger than the minimum required amount.

Give us a call at 866-491-3884 to start a conversation about how to protect your IRA from the government. Don't wait another day. Every day that you wait could be costing you and your family!!!