What is an executor?

An executor is the person named in someone's Last Will and Testament whose job it is to work with the court system to have the assets of a deceased person transferred to their heirs.

Example. Pete wrote a Will leaving his entire estate to his three children. In Pete's Will, he named his oldest child, James, as the executor his Will. When Pete dies, it's James' job to hire an attorney and oversee the Succession or Probate court proceeding to make sure that Pete's estate gets managed correctly and that, ultimately, Pete's three children inherit Pete's estate at the conclusion of the Succession proceedings.

What is an administrator of an estate?

Sometimes people die without ever having written a Will, and a Succession is necessary to transfer the assets that are in their names, to their heirs. Often, the proper Louisiana court will appoint an Administrator to manage the assets of someone who died without a Will. The Administrator's job will also be to follow all of the court rules and see to it that the assets of the deceased ultimately get transferred to the heirs. When someone dies without a Will, state law dictate who inherits, so the Administrator must work with those people throughout the Succession court proceedings.

Example. Seymour died without a Will. Seymour had three children, but one of his children predeceased Seymour. Seymour's predeceased child had five children. After Seymour dies, one of the grandchildren quickly hires an attorney and petitions the court to appoint her as the Administrator of Seymour's Succession. The court appoints the 19 year old grandchild to be the Administrator of Seymour's Succession. The grandchild then will gain access to all of her grandfather's assets while she works with attorneys and the rest of the heirs to manage the estate and ultimately, have a judge order that assets be transferred to the heirs that state law provide that the estate must be transferred to.

What is the difference between an Executor and an Administrator?

Actually, the roles are similar. When someone dies with a Will, the person who wrote the Will named an executor, and the executor must work with heirs and attorneys to manage the estate as it goes through the court process. When someone dies without a Will, then obviously, an executor of a Will was not named, so the proper court must appoint an Administrator to manage the estate under similar rules that an executor would manage an estate.

What is an Independent Executor?

If the Will stated that the executor may act as an "independent executor," then the executor will be permitted to take certain actions that are involved in completing a Succession without having to get a judge's approval in advance.

Example. Jeff's Will stated, "I appoint my daughter, Margaret, as executor of my Will. My executor may act as an independent executor." If Margaret were simply an executor - and not an independent executor - she would need to formally petition a judge to get express written permission from a judge to sell Jeff's house, stock, car, or even his personal items, after Jeff died. This can be a real nuisance and a financial burden when Margaret tries to settle Jeff's estate. But since Margaret is an independent executor, a Succession is still required, but Margaret can take certain actions (like selling estate assets) without first having to petition the court to take that action.

Virtually every Will written in Louisiana these days should authorize the executor to act as an independent executor. If a Will written in Louisiana does not have these express provisions authorizing the executor to serve as an independent executor, then either:

  • the Will was written prior to 2001 when the "Independent Executor" position was created by state law; or
  • the attorney who prepared the Will is shamelessly ill-informed.

What if the Will does not authorize the executor to be independent?

There's hope. If the Louisiana Will does not authorize the executor to be an independent executor, then, generally speaking, all of the heirs can sign an Agreement authorizing the executor to serve as an independent executor. But it must be unanimous. A few other details exist that must be complied with but your Succession Attorney can help you verify whether the Succession you are working with can operate under the independent administration rules.

What is an independent administrator?

If the person who died had no Will, then the court will appoint an Administrator of the Succession. An Administrator must get every action approved by the judge. However, if all of the heirs sign an Agreement allowing the Administrator to be an Independent Administrator, then the administrator can act under the simpler "independent administrator" court proceedings. Every court-appointed Administrator should seek to be appointed as an Independent Administrator.

Does having an Independent Executor avoid probate?

No. Even if there is an independent executor or an independent administrator involved in a Succession, the Succession is still required. There must be court proceedings to get the independent executor or administrator appointed or confirmed. The assets, liabilities, and estate expenses must be documented and valued, the heirs must sign off on the plan for distribution, and accountings are necessary. Judges will still need to get involved to sign various court orders, and court orders will have to be distributed to various heirs, financial institutions and other third parties to "un-freeze" the estate assets to have them managed and ultimately distributed to the heirs.